Leat Perez
Killer-immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genes Polymorphism & BKV Infection in Post-Transplant Kidney & Kidney/Pancreas Recipients

SchoolBeaumont School


ProgramMedical Laboratory


MentorMedhat Askar, MD, PhD


DepartmentAllogen Laboratory


Research
Killer-immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genes Polymorphism & BKV Infection in Post-Transplant Kidney & Kidney/Pancreas Recipients
Hypothesis
Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) interact with certain HLA class I molecules and are likely to affect the immune system's ability to defend against viral infections. Therefore, the trend of higher frequency of inhibitory KIR ligands, rather than activating ligands, will indicate the likelihood of BKV infection prior to transplantation
Methodology
We retrospectively analyzed 199 kidney transplant patients for BKV viremia and viruria and preformed KIR genotyping using reverse Sequence Specific Oligonucleotide Probe (rSSOP) Luminex based assay and/or Sequence Specific Primer (SSP) assay, while the patient’s BKV levels were measured through either the blood or the urine. The donor’s human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing was reviewed from patient charts for determination of KIR ligands. KIR haplotypes were inferred from genotypes and analyzed.
Outcomes
Contrary to the extensive pattern of research in HIV, CMV, HCV, and HSV that proves the correlation of KIR gene polymorphism to the infectious disease outcomes, KIR gene polymorphism in our population was not associated with increased risks of BKV viral activation post-transplant.