Harjoat Singh
A Survey of Attitudes of Young Women with Eating Disorders Toward Different Methods of Birth Control

SchoolMidpark High School


ProgramScience


MentorEllen Rome, MD, MPH


DepartmentGeneral Pediatrics


Research
A Survey of Attitudes of Young Women with Eating Disorders Toward Different Methods of Birth Control
Hypothesis
Women with eating disorders (ED) will have different views on various forms of contraception/birth control (BC) in comparison to the general population.
Methodology
The goal of the study is to evaluate the attitudes and beliefs about different methods of BC held by young women with EDs. We will examine the knowledge of young women with EDs about the effectiveness of various methods of BC in preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the risks and benefits of using BC. This was a survey-based study that included questions about the subjects’ demographic information, beliefs about the effectiveness, risks, and benefits of various forms of BC, their attitudes toward different BC methods, beliefs about the health risks and benefits of BC, and their past and future plans for sexual activity.
Outcomes
The findings confirm the lack of knowledge of both the control and ED subjects regarding the effectiveness of various methods of BC and the risks and benefits of using oral contraceptives. The control group was more cognizant of the effectiveness of various methods of BC in preventing pregnancy than the ED group. Our hypothesis was disproved because the difference in knowledge of birth control does not vary between the ED test group and the control group.